Waiting for R6 of BFCC still.  -_-;  Will be without a computer soon for an entire week, so I’m hoping details are released right before that or right after.

In the meantime …

*glances over at growing buffer for Nuzlocke S3 comics*

miss-sleepy-head:

ART COMMISSIONS PAGE ON DA
HELLO! I decided to take a chance and post a commissions chart on tumblr and DA. Please bare with me because I am somewhat new at this. But I need the money to try and support myself. If interested; here’s what I offer!
WHAT I REFUSE TO DRAW: Robots, over-sexualized characters, porn, MLP and anything I found offensive. (Y’know politics, sensitive subjects. That sort of junk.)
WHAT I CAN DO: Pokemon, dragons, fan-art,Pretty much everything else that is not listed above. However for bloody and extreme shit stuff; I will have to post with some warning on it.. so my parents won’t have my head on a sliver platter. 
Please send me an ask and I will share my email account; so we can discuss in private.

Signal boost, yo.

miss-sleepy-head:

ART COMMISSIONS PAGE ON DA

HELLO! I decided to take a chance and post a commissions chart on tumblr and DA. Please bare with me because I am somewhat new at this. But I need the money to try and support myself. If interested; here’s what I offer!

WHAT I REFUSE TO DRAW: Robots, over-sexualized characters, porn, MLP and anything I found offensive. (Y’know politics, sensitive subjects. That sort of junk.)

WHAT I CAN DO: Pokemon, dragons, fan-art,Pretty much everything else that is not listed above. However for bloody and extreme shit stuff; I will have to post with some warning on it.. so my parents won’t have my head on a sliver platter. 

Please send me an ask and I will share my email account; so we can discuss in private.

Signal boost, yo.

Diversity in Writing

elloellenoh:

I did this post for Write on Com. Figured it would be worth sharing here also.

Diversity in Writing

by author Ellen Oh

Recently, I was part of a conversation where an author said the following: “But there’s been a lot of anger from some quarters about “appropriation” and “exoticism” … I’m terrified of incurring the kind of wrath I’ve seen online, and have decided I’m not qualified to tackle diversity head on.”

Guys, if this is you, then I want to talk to you about why it is okay to “tackle diversity.” If you are the type to say, “Yes, I want to include diversity! I just don’t know how.” I want to talk to you too, because there are right ways and wrong ways to do it. But mostly I want to tell you how important it is that you all are trying. Thank you for that. Because I was once that little girl scanning through the books desperately looking for someone like me, who wasn’t a stereotype. And now I have kids who are doing the same thing. Thank you for wanting to have this conversation.

But if you are scared about being called out for including diversity in your book, then wake up and smell the diapers, children, because you are not going to be able to make everybody happy. Someone somewhere is going to be offended for something you wrote and for a reason that you never intended! You wrote a girl empowerment book? How dare you put down feminine girls! You wrote about sexual exploitation? How dare you write a slut shaming book! You wrote a POC main character? How dare you white person try and exploit minorities!

Look, I’m Korean American and I wrote a fantasy book based in ancient Korea. I studied it for 10 years on top of all that I knew from being raised by Korean immigrants. And yet I had plenty of people bash me for getting things “wrong” about Korean culture in my book – and most of them weren’t even Korean! So the one thing I can promise you with absolute assurance is, someone somewhere is going to be irate at you for writing. Whether it is the fact that you wrote a POC character or the fact that you are posing in your author picture with a hand to your cheek, someone is going to hate you for something. Listen, you are not ever going to make everyone happy. That’s just human nature. I bet someone out there is reading this post right now and pissed off at me just because they don’t like my face. What can you do? You can start not caring about making everybody happy.

Now writing about POC is a bit different in that most people are afraid of being called a racist. So they avoid diversity because of it. However, let me reassure you that by not including diversity, you are also being called a racist. Maybe not to your face, but you are. And guess what? Being called a racist is nowhere near as painful as dealing with actual racism.

Now that I have freed you from the fear of being reviled on the internet, let’s talk about a few things that you need to keep in mind:

  1. Do your research and be respectful. Don’t culturally appropriate from POC and then claim that your world is different therefore you can do whatever the hell you want with it. Call your world whatever you want, but if your world looks and sounds like China, and you even use Chinese words and architecture and terms specific to that culture, then don’t pretend it’s not China and mix us up with every other Asian culture. It just reeks of sloppy research and not giving a damn. If you want your world to feel Asian without specifically calling out a specific country, it can be done – see Eon/Eona. See The Last Airbender series.
  2. Avoid stereotypes. There are many. The magical negro, the blonde bimbo, the smart Asian math whiz, the ghetto talking black kid, the feisty Latina, the Asian dragon lady, the cryptic but wise Native American, the uppercrusty WASP, etc. Using stereotypes is lazy writing. You don’t want to invest in your character’s development to go beyond an easily recognizable trope. Don’t do this.
  3. Exotification of another culture. “But remember, there are two ways to dehumanize someone: by dismissing them, and by idolizing them.” ? David Wong. I think the context of this quote was about women and how men view them. But it works well in this context also. If you don’t include POC in your book, you are dismissing them. If you do include POC but make them exotic and other-worldish, you are going the other way. Neither is acceptable.
  4. Check your privilege. Don’t get mad that I used the “P” word. I know privilege can be a touchy subject. Asking you to be aware of your privilege is not the same as calling you a racist. What I’m doing is asking you to be aware of it. If you are a female, then you know that male privilege is very real. Take what you understand as male privilege and make a correlation to white privilege and you will see what I mean. And if it helps, read this: http://ted.coe.wayne.edu/ele3600/mcintosh.html
  5. Reach out to minorities for help.  If you know nothing about the culture that you want to include in your book, then reach out for help. Yes, you can find a lot of information on the internet, but some things you can only learn from people who live that culture 24/7.

It won’t be easy, and it shouldn’t be! You will probably make mistakes. And that’s ok! You’ll learn from them and you will fail less and less the more you try. But the most important thing is that you try. Because you are writing for kids. All our kids! And they need to see that their books can reflect their world.

Drawing practice from before Oxford.  I wanted to flex out Casper and Ammy— and, I had a note on my board saying that I should draw OCs dancing.  : )  The two would get along.

Drawing practice from before Oxford.  I wanted to flex out Casper and Ammy— and, I had a note on my board saying that I should draw OCs dancing.  : )  The two would get along.

That moment when you fact-check a story and it’s all good.

That moment when the fact-checking is on alcohol overdose and there’s no way for the story to end well for the main character.

ocentropy:

Pages 168 - 169 are up!

Pages 170 - 171 are up!
- start - archive - on the boards - Updates are every Sunday.

selenoscope:

reyairia:

70% of editing is just looking at ur work for a few hours with this face

image

true story

true for drawing

true for video editing

true for writing

just true

chasingriversong:

Chuck Wendig on editing. A good read. NSFW for language, if you care.

What are recurrent themes you find yourself returning to in your works? What about those themes interests you, and how do you see them shaping the narrative form of your stories, if they do? What are the major themes of some of your characters?

I’ve been thinking of a good way to answer this for over a month, and I still don’t have satisfactory answers.  So, I’m going to just type whatever I think first.

I like to write a lot about inner struggle.  My main characters go through hell, but I want them to come out a lot stronger than before— partially so that, through them, I, too, can learn.  I really like development.  Really like.  It’s amazing how much a character can change, for better or for worse … through what other characters they interact with, the environment they’re placed in, ect.  I guess that answers the next two questions, too …

"Major themes" is tricky because themes and I don’t get along.  XD;  Especially when identifying them.  It’s hard to pin down ideas in simple words or phrases …  I guess to repeat myself: inner struggle.  Not resolving "inner deamons" but learning to live with them (addiction, self-harm, sociopathic urges, schizophrenia, ect. ect.).  The meaning of authority and its influence on others.  How to fight authority (because I usually go with it, but really, it’s often so stupid.  And, look at the US Gov.  Really.).  I think that’s it …

I’m really bad at talking about my own writing.  XD;;;  Need to get better at that, especially for upcoming submitting.

T, Z, and/or F?

T. AGE I GET MISTAKEN FOR.  I was seen as a senior when I was a freshman, but I think that’s more due to maturity than what age I look like.  > >;  angryskitty has no opinion to contribute on the matter.

Character-wise: Kevin’s forever mistaken as ten.  The poor guy.  Ambrose got stuck with immortality that he never wanted, so he’s always fifteen.  Disaster actually wished to be older, so he went from preteen to twenty appearance-wise.  It took him a while to catch up, but he’s always been a rather “adult” kid.  Kinda.  > >;  When it counts.

Z. HOW ARE YOU? Pretty good, thanks.  : )  Watchin’ Yu Yu Hakusho with my favorite sister, but you know that.  : P

F. MY FAVOURITE MOVIE.  DAMN IT, NOT AGAIN.  NO.  NO DECISIONS.  FOREVER INDECISIVE.

What're you're thoughts on the whole 'Catholic / Protestant' thing? Do you see a divide between the denominations?
Anonymous

Hnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnngh.  > <;

I only know about it historically (the Great Schism, ect.).  My church kinda avoids the difference in religion (it’s, like, the only thing I like about our priest.  He sings way too slow and is too settled in our church to catch that his sermons are boring/ too long/ whatever …  bleh).  Basically, they’re similar beliefs but dealt with differently.  I believe similarly about most religions, monotheism and beyond.

F, E, and B! For you! Or your characters! Or both! \ouo/

All of the above.  >: D

F. MY FAVOURITE MOVIE.  I don’t have a favorite.  D :  DECISIONS.  Rise of the Guardians is one of the few movies I own, though.  Perhaps the only, at this point.  > >;

Most of my characters don’t watch television.  I’ve recently headcanon’d that Laughter and Disaster (two deities who are either best friends or romantically involved, depending on when you catch them) like Doctor Who.  I really need to draw them singing the theme.  XD;

E. MY BEST FRIEND.  SEE, THIS IS THE SAME DECISION-MAKING AS BEFORE.  WHY.  Hnnnngh, I don’t have many besties outside of the comp nowadays.  : /  One moved/ got married as I was studying abroad, and just as I was getting back in contact with her, she stopped replying.  Busy lives, I guess.

Laughter and Disasters are besties.  Ambrose and Laughter are friends, too (Disaster has a crush on Ammy, which is hella awkward).  Damian, Ckristian, and Xeno from the story (see my twitter for updates on that) I’m revising for submission are the best friends evar.  : P

B. FAVORITE BAND.  AGAIN WITH THE DECISIONS.  DAMN IT.  I usually listen to soundtracks— Rise of the Guardians, Phantom of the Opera, Hunchback of Notre Dame, and so on.

Damian likes Green Day.  Because "American Idiot."

Do it.
A. WHY MY LAST RELATIONSHIP ENDED.
B. FAVORITE BAND.
C. WHO I LIKE AND WHY I LIKE THEM.
D. HARDEST THING I’VE EVER BEEN THROUGH.
E. MY BEST FRIEND.
F. MY FAVOURITE MOVIE.
G. SEXUAL ORIENTATION.
H. DO I SMOKE/DRINK?
I. HAVE ANY TATTOOS OR PIERCINGS?
J. WHAT I WANT TO BE WHEN I GET OLDER.
K. RELATIONSHIP WITH MY PARENTS.
L. ONE OF MY INSECURITIES.
M. VIRGIN OR NOT?
N. FAVOURITE PLACE TO SHOP AT?
O. MY EYE COLOUR.
P. WHY I HATE SCHOOL.
Q. RELATIONSHIP STATUS AS OF RIGHT NOW.
R. FAVOURITE SONG AT THE MOMENT.
S. A RANDOM FACT ABOUT MYSELF.
T. AGE I GET MISTAKEN FOR.
U. WHERE I WANT TO BE RIGHT NOW.
V. LAST TIME I CRIED.
W. CONCERTS I’VE BEEN TO.
X. WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF (…)?
Y. DO YOU WANT TO GO TO COLLEGE.
Z. HOW ARE YOU?

boazpriestly:

  • Over-explanation. This includes prologues. “Prologues are never needed. You can usually throw them in the garbage. They’re usually put on as a patch.”
  • Too much data. “You’re trying to seduce your reader, not burden them,” Friedman said.
  • Over-writing, or “trying too hard.” “We think the more description we add, the more vivid it will be; but we don’t want to be distracted from the story” we open the book for.
  • Beginning the novel with an interior monologue or reflection. Usually this is written as the thoughts of a character who is sitting alone, musing and thinking back on a story. Just start with the story.
  • Beginning the novel with a flashback. Friedman isn’t entirely anti-flashback, but the novel’s opening page is the wrong place for one.
  • Beginning a novel with the “waking up sequence” of a character waking, getting out of bed, putting on slippers, heading for the kitchen and coffee…a cliche
  • Related cliche: beginning the novel with an alarm clock or a ringing phone
  • Starting out with an “ordinary day’s routine” for the main character
  • Beginning with “crisis moments” that aren’t unique: “When the doctor said ‘malignant,’ my life changed forever…” or “The day my father left us I was seven years old…”
  • Don’t start with a dialogue that doesn’t have any context. Building characterization through dialogue is okay anywhere else but there.
  • Starting with backstory, or “going back, then going forward.”
  • Info dump. More formally called “exposition.”
  • Character dump, which is four or more characters on the first page.

I think I can cross out all of these for Damian’s story … finally.  XD;

Plane pictures, 3/3 (1/3 and 2/3).

nerdsrow said: Hati. Aaaaaaaay. ;]
kantobromance said: Design some pokemon gijinka~

Two gijinka: Human!Hati and Human!Vera.
These were all drawn on the plane home from Oxford using three ciao copics I bought there (pastel colors) and two ink pens (Faber-Castell’s S and Pentel’s .03 art pen), along with a handy mechanical pencil.
And, that&#8217;s it!  This was really fun and challenging (in a good way).  I&#8217;ll try this again sometime. &#160;: )

Plane pictures, 3/3 (1/3 and 2/3).

nerdsrow said: Hati. Aaaaaaaay. ;]

kantobromance said: Design some pokemon gijinka~

Two gijinka: Human!Hati and Human!Vera.

These were all drawn on the plane home from Oxford using three ciao copics I bought there (pastel colors) and two ink pens (Faber-Castell’s S and Pentel’s .03 art pen), along with a handy mechanical pencil.

And, that’s it!  This was really fun and challenging (in a good way).  I’ll try this again sometime.  : )